2013 Best Companies for Multicultural Women in Pictures | Working Mother

2013 Best Companies for Multicultural Women in Pictures

Successful working moms of color from our winning companies share how their personal histories have impacted their careers—and the advice they give their own daughters.

Laurena L. Emhoff

Laurena L. Emhoff

Vice President & Treasurer, The New York Times Company, mom of Bailey, 7, And Ava, 5

“My mid-thirties were full of epiphanies. I was having a hard time juggling everything, thinking there was something that everyone else had—some secret superpower—that I was missing. Then I realized: There’s no magic. Life’s full of imbalances and you just do your best. But I get a lot of joy from spending time with my family, talking and laughing. I lived in the Caribbean as a child, and the house was always full of laughter. I’m also inspired by my grandmother: She emigrated from St. Vincent to Trinidad as a young woman, had five kids and worked as a caterer. When I’m having a difficult day, I think of her strength.”

Tiff Pemberton

Padmasree Warrior

Padmasree Warrior

Chief Technology & Strategy Officer, Cisco systems. mom of Karna, 20

“I started my career in the male-dominated semiconductor industry. You’re expected to handle yourself a certain way, dress a certain way, talk a certain way. I grew up in an environment where we talked about family all the time, but I didn’t feel comfortable doing that at work. I love jewelry and colors, but at work I wore a pinstripe suit with shoulder pads. After a couple of years, I started wearing bright tops and diamond earrings to the office and talking about my family. A funny thing happened: Being more authentic got me closer to my colleagues and made me a more effective leader.”

Kent Clemenco

Kim Goodman

Kim Goodman

President of Global Business Travel, American Express, mom of Evan Maria, 7, and twins Malachi and Berklee, 4

“People are generally more comfortable with those who are like themselves. If you’re an Oakland Raiders fan, you connect with other Raiders fans. If you moved around a lot as a military kid, you’ve got more in common with those who’ve had that experience. As a multicultural woman, I’ve had to be diligent about bridging the comfort gap while staying true to myself. It’s not about fitting in. It’s about building relationships with people and deepening them in a genuine way. I play golf because I like it, but it’s also a great way to connect with others. It’s smart in this globalizing workplace to make linkages with all kinds of people.”

Dennis Mosner/Bruce Levin Group

Ana Duarte McCarthy

Ana Duarte McCarthy

Chief Diversity Officer, Citi, mom of Alissa, 17

“Here’s one thing I tell my daughter: People may look at her and make judgments about her, but she should never let those judgments be her guide. She should know what she wants and set her own goals. While the world has gotten more diverse, you don’t have to look too far to find those who’ll try to limit opportunities available to multicultural women. Don’t let that limit your success—or who you are. We need to embrace our culture, language and experience, instead of trying to conform. We need to be grounded in our own true north—our core values.”

Caitlin Mitchell

Denise Evans

Denise Evans

Vice President, Market Development, IBM. mom of Allison, 27

“I’ve learned a lot about myself from scary situations. When I was in my twenties, my manager chose me for a roundtable with a visiting executive. I was shy. I wanted to say something meaningful, but the only thing that popped into my head was a weird question about a client situation, which I blurted out. To my surprise, the executive asked me to write a white paper on it. I stayed up all night and did it. I realized I had insight, could assess a problem quickly, could perform in an intense situation—skills I’ve used throughout my career. And that executive became my mentor.”

Max Hirshfeld

Latest


More Stories


Videos